With the first ever open source Industrial Ethernet Master Redundancy Design, now you can add the high availability component into your automation network with ease, using openPOWERLINK and its Open-source network configuration tool openCONFIGURATOR. The design supports multiple OS and non OS systems with the tool providing intuitive configuration options on a familiar Eclipse environment.

 

 

 

Features:

  • Open-source BSD license
  • Multiple Redundant Masters
  • OS and non OS support
  • No additional hardware
  • User configurable Active Master switchover time down to 1 network cycle
  • Cyclic data and network time synchronization on redundant masters
  • Support for user application forced switchover of Active Master

Getting started on openPOWERLINK Redundant Master Demo on Raspberry Pi2

1. Hardware requirements

The hardware items required to run openPOWERLINK Redundant MN demo on Raspberry Pi2 are as follows:

  • 2 Raspberry Pi2 board to act as the openPOWERLINK Redundant Masters
  • 1 Raspberry Pi2 board to act as the openPOWERLINK Slaves
  • 1 Network switch
  • 4 Ethernet cables
  • 1 Micro SD card reader
  • 3 Micro SD card
  • 3 sets of HDMI display, USB keyboard and mouse
  • 3 sets of Micro USB cables to power the Raspberry Pi2 boards
2. Software requirement?

Following are the software packages and its dependencies to be downloaded to run openPOWERLINK Redundant MN demo on Raspberry Pi2.

3. Download the pre-built binaries
  • To download the pre-built binaries – click here

4. Steps to boot Raspberry Pi2

This section describes the steps to boot Raspberry Pi2 with Ubuntu Linux.

  • Load the Ubuntu Linux image on the micro SD card and insert it into the Raspberry Pi2 board

  • Next, plug in the USB keyboard and mouse into the USB slots on the Raspberry Pi2

  • Make sure that the monitor or TV is turned on, then connect the HDMI cable from the Raspberry Pi2 to the monitor or TV

  • Finally plug in the micro usb power supply. This action will turn on and boot the Raspberry Pi2

5. Run the openPOWERLINK redundant demo on Raspberry Pi2

This section describes the steps to be carried out to run openPOWERLINK Redundant MN demo on Raspberry Pi2.

  • Copy the binary package: openPOWERLINK_RMN_RaspberryPi2.tar.gz into a USB thumb drive

  • Transfer openPOWERLINK_RMN_RaspberryPi2.tar.gz package to all three Raspberry Pi2 boards by connecting the drive to the USB port of the Raspberry Pi2

  • Open a terminal program

  • For mounting the USB drive and copying the binaries, follow the below steps:

    • sudo su

    • mount /dev/sda1 /mnt

    • cp -R /mnt/* /home/linaro

Figure 1: Mounting USB thumb drive

  • Extract the files using the command:

    • tar -xvf openPOWERLINK_RMN_RaspberryPi2.tar.gz

  • Change to the RMN application directory:

    • cd openPOWERLINK_RMN_RaspberryPi2/RMN_1/demo_mn_console

Figure 2: AMN application directory

  • Load the kernel driver using the command:

    • sudo modprobe tun

Figure 3: Loading driver for AMN

  • Run the demo RMN application using the command:

    • sudo ./demo_mn_console

Figure 4: Run AMN application

  • Choose interface as ‘eth0’ when prompt appears to start the openPOWERLINK redundant master

Figure 5: Choose interface for AMN

  • Now the openPOWERLINK RMN (Active RMN) log can be viewed in the terminal.

Follow the steps to run openPOWERLINK CN demo on Raspberry Pi2 simultaneously.

  • Open a terminal program in Slave Raspberry Pi

  • Change to the CN application directory:

    • cd openPOWERLINK_RMN_RaspberryPi2/CN_1/demo_cn_console

  • Load the kernel driver using the command:

    • sudo modprobe tun

  • Run the demo CN application using the command:

    • sudo ./demo_cn_console

  • Choose interface as ‘eth0’ when prompt appears to start the openPOWERLINK slave

  • Now the openPOWERLINK CN log also can be viewed in the MN terminal

Figure 6: Initializing Process Image

 

Figure 7: AMN Operational

 

Figure 8: Slave Operational

 

  • Repeat the above steps to run openPOWERLINK Redundant MN demo on another Raspberry Pi2

Figure 9: SMN application directory

 

Figure 10: Load driver for SMN

 

Figure 11: Run SMN application

 

Figure 12: Select interface for SMN

 

Figure 13: SMN Operational log

 

  • In the Active RMN terminal, standby RMN log can also be viewed (Refer Figure: 15, 16)

Figure 14: SMN state changes in AMN terminal

 

Figure 15: SMN Operational state in AMN terminal

 

  • In case of failure of Active RMN (Node ID: 241), Standby RMN (Node ID: 242) turns out to be active in the network

Figure 16: Switch over of SMN to active

That’s it; you’ve got a running POWERLINK network!

We hope we have helped you in getting started with your Deterministic Ethernet journey. Keep in touch!